Send a chicken to An African women- new additions

In my last post about this program, I told you about my visit with the women in May.   Two months after I left news of new additions to the program reached me.

In the last update the women were grappling with the impact of avian flu on the egg market and rather than sell the eggs for very little money, the women decided to keep the eggs and figure out how to hatch them. 

 The women have let all their hens go free range, in turn this fooled the hens into seating on their eggs. 

The results have been amazing. This has meant new additions to the original number of  chicks we gave the women and the start of scaling up of these micro chicken farms. 

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Christine

The best performer so far is Christine. She had three cocks that she sold and bought a couple of goats. This will enable her to take part in our goat cross breeding program and therefore enable her to access goat milk as part of her diet.

Christine stopped selling her eggs as she was only getting £1.90 per tray of 30 eggs. She has started selling tow month old chicks at £2.15 and she earned £17.20 from the sale of 8 chicks. 

Christine had zero income at the start of the program and lived off the land and as such £17.20 is a a fortune. This is equivalent to what a teacher would earn at a local school would earn in two months.  

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Jadress Kabiga has  new additions to her micro farm too. I was surprised to learn that she has 16 one month old chicks from the eggs of two hens.

Jadress’ chickens and some of the new additions. 

This is Sylvia who we told you about earlier in the year. She  is still collecting eggs as well as
hatching. She has 5 three week old chicks that she will sell at two months. Two months is the age at which a chick is deemed able to adapt to a new environment.

This was a new program for us, and we are very pleased with the impact it is having on women’s livelihoods. We are grateful to our friends and supporters who have made this possible, 

Pig farming- a new project for ultra poor women

A few weeks ago we added pig farming to our range of livelihood programmes for ultra poor women in Ntungamo district. Through this program, we provide women with an asset as well as training. these are women without capital to start enterprises and the asset we provide enables the women to generate income as well as build capital for reinvestment . 

In the latest project, a group of 20 widows have been provided with a  two-month old pig to look after until it gives birth to the first set of piglets. At that stage the Sow as well as two piglets will become the property of the woman to enable her to grow a micro pig farm from which she can generate an income as well as well as improve the diet of her family.

 

These are the women that are currently enrolled on the pig project.
 

The women were given a piglet of the Cambarough pig breed. This breed is reportedly very good at looking after its young and  for littering up to 14 piglets from one pregnancy. This means that a woman can grow her micro farm quickly. 

Distribution  day- I am told that this was a fun day as of the piglets attempted to run away having been contained on the truck for an hour. 

The women were also given commercial feed for the piglet to enable them to settle into their new homes

pig
Crossbreed piglets

Some of the women were given this type of piglet, which is a cross breed of a local boar and the Landrace pig.  This was a good outcome for the local man who bred them. He was given the Sow as a present by someone who had a similar objective  to us- giving an asset that the recipient can use to generate an income.

This local man earned £120 by selling 9 two month old piglets into the project. This is not a great deal of money to most in the West, but for someone that had no income at all, this is a fortune.

For our part, it was a pleasure to contribute to this man’s livelihood as  well as enabling these piglets to remain in the environment they are familiar with and we hope that, they will thrive as a result. 

pig
Local carpenter working on the pig sty

As well as working with the women on setting up these micro pig farms, we have set up a stand alone pig farm. This will enable us to provide piglets to the wider community without the need to raise more money. 

This is the completed pig sty. We sourced all the materials from local suppliers and used local labour. 

 

 

pig

The pigs move in. We have started off with 4 6 and 7 month old pigs and all being well, we will have our first baby pigs in December.

Goat project phase 2

In January this year, we announced the birth of our first baby goats .  

I am pleased to report that 4 of those kids are now ready to leave home. The two females will be given to the next widows in the queue whilst the males will be sold on and the money will go back into the project.  

For the women  who were first in the queue, the goat has now become their personal asset. This means that they do not have to pass on the next round of kids.

This is Jovlet, a real star in the program. She adores goats. This is the female kid she is passing on to her neighbour. 

This is Lydia, I caught up with Lydia in May this year and she was very eager to show off her handiwork. She kept meticulous records of her goat’s feeding, vaccinations etc. I can’t imagine how she coped with passing on the kid to someone else. 


 These are the recipients  of the new kids and one of them has volunteered to look after one of the male kid for 6 months. 

Maria’s goat is pregnant again.. she is off to a good start

This Maria with the Project Manager Osbert. Maria has been a strong advocate for this program as her daughter died right after delivering her baby girl so Maria used goat’s milk to feed her grandchild for almost a year.

Os, on the goat trail.. this means he is collecting all the kids that were board in January and are ready to leave home.

I am pleased to see the next phase of this project as this was a new project for us and we were not sure, how it would pun out. 

 

For regular updates about our work in Ntungamo district, please please like our Facebook Page  https://www.facebook.com/LetThemHelpthemselves/

 

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