Goat project- Training gets underway

The Diary goat project has kicked off in earnest. This week a trainer from Joy Goat Development arrived to provide training to the widows as well as those in the community who will benefit from the crossbreeding program.

goat
Kalenzi- Inspecting a goat shelter

Kalanzi Med, from JOY Goat Development, assessing the buck stations and providing guidance on how to build the feeding platform

Osbert -LTHT Project Manager and Joy Goat expert visiting Maria’s buck station. There is still a bit of work to do on her female goat house but now she’s got the knowledge how to finalise it properly

Osbert

LTHT Project Manager explaining attendees about the type of fodder suitable to grow in our area which they can feed to their goats

Buck -keepers

Buck keeper training session – These guys are the role models of the cross breeding program. They will be responsible to keep our males healthy and active, identifying suitability of goats for mating and are empowered to turn down mating partners if they’re too young, too small or not healthy. 

Buck-keepers photo op

Buck keepers group photo in front of LTHT buck station + male kid collection pen.

In the next village, it was mostly women who turned up for training

Widows' training session

These are the widows who are signed up to the goat project. They will receive a a female halfbreed kid to look after until it gives birth. The grown goat becomes the widow’s personal property and the kids are then passed on to another widow in the group

buck station

We anticipate that some of the kids will be male and this is where they will be looked after

Keep an eye on this space and  our Facebook page for updates

The dairy goat project for widows

In 2015 we set out on a journey to establish types of interventions that improve the livelihoods of girls and women from rural villages in Itojo Sub-County, where Ruhanga parish is located.

As part of that strategy we have worked with  a local women’s group KAMINYA TUKORE to set up 29 Micro poultry farms under the SEND  A CHICKEN TO AN AFRICAN WOMAN program.

In our next intervention, we revisited an issue we had been working on since 2014- Menstrual Hygiene Management.  Our objective under this program is to ensure that girls and women manage their periods in a hygienic way. This involves ensuring that girls and women have access to information about menstruation as well as access to clean and safe menstrual absorbents.

This program also provides employment for three local young women. It is our ambition to ensure that this program is accessible to girls and women across the district of Ntungamo

Widows and the goat loan project

goat loan project
Widows from Ruhanga with Goat Program Manager Os Nyesiga

Under this project we are working in collaboration with the NGO Joy Goat Development, to introduce a new breed of dairy goats into Ruhanga parish. The main beneficiaries of this program are widows, who will receive a 50% cross breed female dairy goat as a loan. They will be responsible to care for the goat until it produces the first kid.

Once the first births are weaned, the off springs will be returned to LTHT and the women at that point will be given sole ownership over the initial goat. This goat will then become an asset that the woman can use to generate income, support herself and her family through;

  • continuous sale of the goat’s offspring,
  • sale of goat’s milk
  • or improve the nutritional intake of their family if they opt for personal consumption.

Once the kids have been returned to LTHT, the female goats will be given to the next widow, while the male goats will be sold, using the profits to purchase more female goats so the cycle continues even if on-going sponsorship is unavailable.

Crossbreed program

On top of that, the whole community will also benefit from this program via a cross breeding program. .

goat
Toggenburg buck

Local female goats will mate with pure male dairy goats with a view to creating  off-springs that can produce a meaningful amount of milk. This will improve  the community’s nutritional intake radically.

We will spend the next few weeks getting the community ready for this program before the goats arrive, Keep an eye on this space for updates.

Send a chicken to an African woman- the story so far

Back in August 2015 we started on a journey to work with the women in Ruhanga SW Uganda on initiatives that would improve their incomes.  By November we had settled on the idea of micro poultry farms for 29 women.

It has been an interesting journey so far that has seen women trained up in chicken feeding, coop building  before being handed the chicks to look after on International Women’s Day

Dorothy outside her kitchen coup
Dorothy outside her chicken coup

This is a typical chicken coop built from local materials. We provided wire mesh, nails doors and iron sheets and the women did the rest.

Women collecting their share of chicken feed
Women collecting their share of chicken feed

Each woman was given  70kg of quality feed for their chickens. This feed will cover the first three months. It is anticipated that the chicks will be let out  for a couple of hours a day to supplement their diet with greens and insects. By the end of the three months  the chickens should have started laying. The women will be able to afford the chicken feed themselves from the se hopefu

 

Maria giving out vitamins
Maria giving out vitamins

The chicks were very tired when they arrived from the breeder on International Women’s Day celebrations and needed vitamins. This is Maria distributing chicken Vitamins to the women.

Ida giving out chikcs
Ida giving out chicks to Sylvia

Having worked on this from a distance, it was an absolute pleasure to be present at the launch by handing out chicks to women. I must say I was overwhelmed by the energy and atmosphere of the day.

 

Night and her husband Paddy with their share of chicks
Night and her husband Paddy with their share of chicks

Night Barayemura is one of the beneficiaries of this initiative. She’s 40 years old and has 7 beautiful children. As many others in the community, she’s a subsistence farmer and currently earns an average of £4 a month by selling some of her green bananas (matooke), beans and ground nuts (peanuts) around the village. Through this project, she’s hoping to provide a better diet for her family as they currently consume green vegetables twice a week and meat only on Christmas Day.

Caroline and her husband collect their laying box
Caroline and her husband collect their laying box

Following the distribution of the boxes, the carpenter was once again very busy making up 29 laying boxes. The boxes are very heavy and it was good see that men recognised this and stepped in to help their wives take the boxes home.

Secondary Beneficiaries

This program has benefited suppliers of  services too

 

Denis- Carpenter on the Chicken project
Denis (one in the stripped polo shirt)- Carpenter on the Chicken project

Denis (one in stripped polo shirt) is 32 years old and is married with three children. Currently, he has a team of 7 carpenters and apprentices who help him with different orders. They mostly build doors and seats. For the ‘Send a chicken to an African woman’ project, he built 15 feeders and 27 nest boxes. He reckons his profits were about 240,000 UGX, (£51.62) which he reinvested in materials for his workshop.

Send a chicken
Ronald Carpenter on the chicken program

Ronald is 32 years old and is married with 3 children. He has benefited twice fold from the ‘Send a chicken to an African woman’ project. Some of the women asked him for help to build their chicken coops and LTHT contracted him to build 27 doors and 14 feeders. He hired two additional people to complete the job, at a rate of 10,000 UGX (£2.15) per day. He told us his net profit from the LTHT contract was 500,000 UGX (107.53), which he used to buy new materials for his business.

 

Ultra poverty
KAMINYA TUKORE committee signing supply contract with Ruth (animal print dress)

Ruth is 33 years old and has one daughter. Ruth is poultry and farmer and supplied 330 chicks to the project which meant increased income and a profit of UGX 1.3 (279.56). Ruth says that, the project has given her an opportunity to help her other women through sharing with them the knowledge about poultry keeping. This had always been her long time desire as she wants to see women work there way out of the poverty. In addition, the project has created awareness about her business thus expanding her clientele base.

Next steps

In the next steps the women will learn about routes to market, book keeping and savings. If you would like to be updated as to the women’s progress sign up to our Newsletter  or like our Facebook Page

 

 

 

 

Feeders, Drinkers and chickens

There has been good progress with the chicken initiative. The local carpenters have been busy. The chicken coops are nearly done. Next on the agenda is coops inspections before the chickens arrive next month.

2016-02-14 10.41.19

Drinkers and feeders ready to go. Feeders were hand made by Denis and Ronal our local carpenters

2016-02-14 14.52.54

Participants in the chicken initiative collect their feeders and drinkers

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Rovina and Linious excited to receive their feeders and drinkers… They told us they cannot wait for us to come and check their chicken coops

2016-02-14 14.52.55-3
Monic and Jovlet with their feeders and drinkers

End of year Report from LTHT

Christmas is a few weeks away and we thought this would be a good time to not only wish you a Merry Xmas but also share with you some of our achievements  in Ruhanga -Uganda in 2015

Our focus in 2015 has been the individual through our Skills Development Initiative (SDI)

As part of SDI, girls in Ruhanga learned how to make sanitary towels that were then distributed to 37 teenage girls in the village
http://www.lethemhelpthemselves.org/index.php/skills-development-initiative-tailoring/

In August, we met with some of the girls who benefited from the program and their mothers. Here is how we got on
http://www.lethemhelpthemselves.org/index.php/menstrual-hygiene-in-rural-uganda/

Women in the village: Following the August review of the first phase of SDI, it became apparent that women had been largely excluded from previous interventions and that we  didn’t know enough about their needs.

We sought to change this in Phase 2 through a series of meetings with the women facilitated by Maria and Alex.

There is now, a new and more inclusive women’s group and agreement amongst the group on initiatives that  will enable them to increase their income and acquire new skills.

Alex explains http://www.lethemhelpthemselves.org/index.php/2015/10/

One of those initiatives is the poultry initiative and 30 women  have signed up already. Through this initiative, women will  acquire skills in semi intensive poultry keeping and increase their income from 40p to roughly £1.76 a week

Alex has carried out home assessments of all the women who have agreed to be part of this initiative.  From the information gathered, we have gained an insight into the level of financial and practical support participants  will need to succeed.

We also have an understanding of what it will cost us to set up.

We need to raise a further £1500 to get the initiative off the ground. We are therefore running a campaign called SEND A CHICKEN TO AN AFRICAN WOMAN. A donation of £2.50 can make a huge difference.

To support this initiative please visit our campaign pages at

http://www.lethemhelpthemselves.org/index.php/send-a-chicken/

or

http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fund/sendachicken

We also set up a bursary for women in Ruhanga to learn how to use a sewing machine. We currently have four women enrolled on this programme.

We will provide feedback on their progress in the new year.

London Marathon: Our application for a space at next year’s London Marathon was successful. We have a space and  our runner is Jenn Dutton  and this is her fundraising page http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/JenniferDutton1 .

Please show her some love by sharing her page

 

For regular updates about our work in Ruhanga, please visit our Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/LetThemHelpthemselves/

 

Thank you for being part of our journey in 2015. We wish you a Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year

Alex, Freda, Julie, Maria, Sadia and Ida

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