Goat Project : updates and news

It has been while since our last updates on the goat project. I reported that we had, had our very first baby goats and I am back with even more news.

 

 

 

New Kids on the block : As you will see from the photos above, we now have 7 kids (3 females & 4 males)  as the goats started delivering in December. The icing on the cake thus far, is the birth last month of female twin kids by Maria’s goat.   We do need more female kids as these are the ones we pass on to widows waiting in the queue for a goat of their own. The new round of distribution will be in July when the new borns  are six months old. The selected widows have started work on goat shelters. 

 

Milk production:  Most of the women whose goats have delivered have access to at least 1 pint of milk every day. But some  are not milking their goats at all such as Merida whose goat gave birth during the dry season and Maria whose goat had twins.  

Crossbreeding program 

goat
Alejandro

The other part of our program is crossbreeding. Through this program, everyone in the district is able to crossbreed their local goats with the three 100% pure diary bucks. The aim of this program is to create a new breed of goats. 

The bucks have been busy,

  • Alejandro has four offsprings (3 females and 1 male) and mated 3 new females in February.  The community is super impressed with the offsprings  and have started spreading the word about the program in the nearby villages of  Migorora, Kakiizi and Nyamuhani.
  • Force has mated 2 females so far and  has  2 offsprings which are males. 
  • Ronaldo has mated 2 females so far and has 1 offspring which is a female. 

A word from our program manager 

The widows are extremely happy with the program and have shared this with the local leaders as well as those in the community that are not yet part of this program

The women who have milk have different opinions: Lydia is enjoying it very much, Vairot says it is ok and Jovannis says it tastes different to the one from cows but is still drinking it. 

Take up of the crossbreeding loan is still low in the villages of Rwentojo and Kytinda where Force and Ronaldo live. It would appear the communities there are not aware of the program we therefore need to run a program campaign

The kids are developing well with the exception of the male from Merida’s goat – it’s a 25% male which didn’t seem to get enough milk at the beginning of its life.

It seems half of the widows take their goats with them to the gardens so they’re on a semi-free range systems.  Although  the 50% goats can live like a local goat but it’s better to keep them in a zero grazing environment if possible to maximise the amount of milk they produce.

We are all looking forward to the day when more families can readily access milk as part of their diet. 

For regular updates about this and our other programs, please keep an eye on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/LetThemHelpthemselves/

Meet the girls on Our sewing program

The first term at the sewing workshop has ended. During this term the students have learnt about, Sewing machine parts & functions, Treadling, Hand stitches, Seam sewing, Measurements, Cutting material and Garment construction – skirt, shirt & dress.

The progress made by the girls is so impressive that some have started taking in paid work. This is good news as it means the girls can pay for their own course materials.  They report being very happy with their tutor as well as the team spirit within the class.

Here are some of the girls taking part in this program

KOMUHANGI OVIOUS

Obvious

Age: 18

From: Kahunga (Ntungamo Municipality)

Lives with: Her parents

Siblings: 3 brothers & 4 sisters – She’s number 3

Education: complete Senior 4 in 2015 (O’lvel)

Future plans: Would like to continue sewing

When not in class: She takes the 4 family cows grazing on the hills

 

NWENSHABA EVELYN

Evelyn

Age: 22

From: Ngorogoro (Itojo)

Lives with: Her mother

Siblings: 3 brothers & 2 sisters – She’s number 5

Education: Senior 3 – Completed in 2014

Future plans: Would like to continue sewing

When not in class: She digs in the family’s farm – matooke (green bananas), beans and millet

 

KANSIIME DAPHINE

Daphine

 

Age: 18

From: Rwemihanga (Ruhanga Parish)

Lives with: Her parents

Siblings: 4 brothers – She’s the first born

Education: Primary 6 – Completed in 2014

Future plans: Would like to have her own sewing workshop

When not in class: She cooks at her mom’s restaurant Kikamorie (translation: Look Left and Eat) in Itojo town

 

NUWANSHABA PHIONAH

Phionah

Age: 18

From: Migorora (Ruhanga Parish)

Lives with: Her parents

Siblings: 3 brothers & 5 sisters – She’s number 3. She has a 2 year-old son, Jack.

Education: P7 – Completed in 2013

Future plans: Would like to continue sewing.

When not in class: She farms and cooks for the family

 

ARIHO RONAH

Rhonah

Age: 19

From: Ruhanga (Ruhanga Parish)

Lives with: Her auntie

Siblings: 3 brothers & 3 sisters – She’s the last born

Education: Senior 2 – Completed in 2013

Future plans: Would like to continue sewing.

When not in class: She digs in the family’s plantation – millet & beans

 

NAMARA RONAS

Ronas

Age: 15

From: Kakiizi (Ruhanga Parish)

Lives with: Her auntie

Siblings: 2 brothers & 3 sisters – She’s number 5 (one of her brothers lives with her)

Education: Primary 7 – Completed in 2015

Future plans: Would like to continue sewing.

When not in class: She takes her auntie’s 11 goats grazing

 

 

 

 

 

Introducing Night Barema

On this year’s International Women’s Day we launched the Send a Chicken program for 29 women and their families in Ruhanga. The program aimed to provide an asset to ultra poor women that they could use to generate an income and working  capital that they could reinvestment. One of those participants was Night Barema.

Night

Night spoke with one of our Program Managers and here is how they got on,

What is your name and how old are you?

 N: Barema Night and I am 58 years old

Are you married?

N: I am  a widow. My husband passed away 25 years ago

How many children have you got?

N: I have 6 children. They are all out of school. I live with my last born, Anita, who completed Primary 4 and then dropped out.  

night
Night and three of her children. From left to right: Anita (the last born), Mevis and Deivis

What is your level of education?

N:  I didn’t go to school. My father didn’t think educating daughters was important so only the boys were sent to school. Night thinks her father didn’t go to Heaven because of this. 

What was your life like growing up

N: I used to help the family in the gardens and raising animals. I was born in a village in Ntungamo sub-county and moved to Kakiizi when I was married off at the age of 16. I had my first child a year later. 

How did you hear about LTHT?

N: I belonged to Kakiizi post-test which is a group of women concerned about HIV and I found out about LTHT when they called us  for a meeting

Why did you join?

I wanted to be part of the chicken program because I thought it was an opportunity to learn something new and get additional income

What was your income before you joined the chicken program?

 N: I used to make 10,000-20,000 UGX  (£2.43- £4.87 per month)

How did you earn that income?

N: I had a sugar cane garden which I used to take care of and I sold the sugar canes by the road

What did you spend it on?

N:  I spent it on soap, salt, sugar, and other basic needs for the household

What are you currently earning?

N: I am now making 70,000 UGX  (£17.03 a month) from selling the eggs the chickens produce. I am no longer able to take care of the sugar cane garden so I have lost the income from selling sugar canes. 

What percentage of your income is from the selling of eggs?

N: 100%

What has this income allowed you to do that you were not able to do before?

N: I am now saving 9,000 UGX (£2.19) per month and I have bought a goat. I am reinvesting most of my income in buying high quality feeds for her chickens

Do you  consume some of the eggs?

N: No, I haven’t had a single one

Night with her goats
Night with her goats

Why did she buy a goat?

N: I bought a goat because they’re easy to raise and reproduce quite quickly

How do you hope to benefit from the goat program?

N: I would like to crossbreed my female with one of the dairy males so I can start drinking milk as I currently don’t 

What are your  aspirations?

N: I would like to have a more comfortable life, not having to work so hard anymore to cover my family needs. I would like to learn to write and read as I feel I missed  a great opportunity in the past. I would also love learning to speak a bit of English. 

 What do they hope for their children?

N: I hope my children have a better life than me: get a good paying job, have a healthy family and live comfortably.

What changes would you like to see in you country in your lifetime that would affect you or the girls/women that follow?

N: I would like some factories to come to the area to produce sugar from sugar cane or dry pineapples, so jobs would be created and farmers would have easy access to market. I would also like to see more people having access to water. 

 

Unleashing the Skills Development Initiative Phase 2: Improving incomes for rural women in SW Uganda

Following a successful launching and implementation of the Skills Development initiative: Phase one, LTHT’s in country team did an extensive study on the skills gaps amongst young people in Ruhanga.

It was agreed that computing skills and basic sewing skills could kick start the initiative as a way of addressing the lack of access to jobs for young people in Ruhanga village from a purpose built Vocational Skills Centre.

As it turned out, the initiative’s goals were satisfactorily met as 45 girls and 51 boys were introduced to computers, Micro soft word and Spread Sheets. A total of 6 boys and 18 girls were also trained in basic principles of sewing. 15 girls were also trained in the initial stages of re- usable sanitary towels making. In addition to the above, 5 local women and 3 local young men had a chance to partake on basic computing skills at gratis.

On Wednesday 11 August, 2015, we were privileged to host Ida Horner, Chairperson LTHT and her colleague Paige at Ruhanga.

During their visit, we discussed, among other things, the highs and lows of Phase one and the way forward  as well as how best we could unleash interventions that have an impact on the women’s livelihoods as the interventions that were being implemented at that time did not have a direct impact on the women’s economic empowerment.

Thus it was deemed fit to bring on board interventions that would serve the above purpose. We, the in country team had a series of discussions and several mini surveys to get it from the women themselves on what interventions, they think could best improve the livelihoods of local women in villages such as Ruhanga SW Uganda.

The Chairperson OF KAMINYA addressing one of the meetings
The Chairperson OF KAMINYA addressing one of the meetings

Having established various ideas from the local women, we found it necessary to bring these women together in the first place as Henry Ford once said:

“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.”

As it turned out,  local women formed a group of 30 women under the name “KAMINYA TUKORE WOMEN’S GROUP“. KAMINYA stands for the initials of the three village cells in Ruhanga i.e.KA  for ”Kankizi cell” MI for “Migorora cell” and NYA for “Nyamuhane cell” whereas TUKORE means “we work”. This group chose its steering committee and we consider this a success on our side owing to the fact that Ruhanga houses several women’s groups with different backgrounds.

Having addressed the said divisions amongst various women’s groups in the community, we are certain that it will enable them to reach a common position with respect to articulating their needs as a community, participation and engagement in income generating activities.

After a series of village meetings (facilitated by the LTHT in country team) that have lasted three months, we are now ready to commence the first intervention – Poultry farming. A key consideration of this initiative is to ensure that the women are accountable to each other via their elected leaders who will have responsibility for the day to day outreach work to enable each woman taking part in the study to succeed.

Local Women's Meeting
KAMINYA Tukore Women’s meeting

By the end of the initial six (6) months; it is projected that 30 women will be proficient in poultry keeping and the income of these women will have increased by £7.45 a month.
We shall keep you posted on the new developments!

 

You can support our journey by making a donation at

http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fund/skills4girls

 

Letter of appreciation from Ntungamo district council

Our water project was one of the items discussed at the local district council meeting (Ntungamo District). Our man on the ground Denis Aheirwe received the attached letter in recognition of his efforts to bring clean water to 3 villages in the district. The final number of taps was 19.

To read the letter follow this link

Letter from District.

 

Clean water in the village
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