Our first baby goats

On 21 August 2016 we took delivery of 18 dairy goats for our Widows loan goat and crossbreeding programs. What we didn’t know at the time, was that some amongst the goats were pregnant and we now have our first baby goats 

This is the female baby goat and her mother

 

This is the Male baby goat

Oe of the aims of dairy goats program was to enable women to access milk as part of their diet and the  good news is that the widows whose goats have kids are getting 1 to 2 cups of milk per day for their own consumption.

baby goats

We have had some bad  news too.  One of  the 50% male goats we bought for the cross breeding program died.  He was housed with one of the female goats who was already pregnant. We suspect that he tried to mate with her and because she was not on heat (due being pregnant already) she fought him and injured him with her horns.  This resulted in an eye infection that spread to both eyes and unfortunately, after treating him with antibiotics, he didn’t respond well and died.

baby goat

The program is now under way and we are expecting 3 more baby goats next month so keep an eye on this space for updates.

baby goat

I caught up with some of the women that are part of the program last month. It was interesting to hear about their experiences of caring for the goats and how excited they are the prospect of having access to goat milk. 

The goats are here

After weeks of preparation the goats finally arrived.

goats

Keeping them on the truck was not an easy task

Widows waiting for their goats
Widows waiting for their goats. Some of the widows are so elderly, they sent their sons to represent them.

 

deworming
deworming

Before distribution all goats had to be tagged, deworm them, provide a preventative antibiotic treatment to ensure their adjustment to the new area and environment goes smoothly and trim their hoofs.

goat

This is Lydia from Nyamuhani.  Lydia is one of the widows that received a goat from the goat loan project. She is also one of the people looking after one of the bucks for the goat breeding program. Her female goat is mature enough and she was encouraged to keep her together with the male for a couple of days… We may have our first kid on the way pretty soon.

 

Maria
This is Maria from Migorora. Her daughter died right after delivering her baby girl so Maria used goat’s milk to feed her for almost a year. She’s now a beautiful young lady. Maria is the program’s strongest ambassador for this reason.

 

Jovanis

Jovannis is from Kakiizi. She’s got experience raising goats and currently has 2 female goats that she’s hoping they get on heat soon so she can take them to Alejandro one of the  pure breed male our project manager is hosting

Kalanzi from Joy goat

Kalanzi, the JOY goat development trainer, has taught Osbert how to handle the goats for the different treatments – especially hoof trimming and injecting them.

 

follow up training session

Following the goat distribution, there was further training about the care of goats as well as record keeping, in particular how often the goats mate as well as proper feeding.

Keep an eye on this space for updates

 

 

Goat project- Training gets underway

The Diary goat project has kicked off in earnest. This week a trainer from Joy Goat Development arrived to provide training to the widows as well as those in the community who will benefit from the crossbreeding program.

goat
Kalenzi- Inspecting a goat shelter

Kalanzi Med, from JOY Goat Development, assessing the buck stations and providing guidance on how to build the feeding platform

Osbert -LTHT Project Manager and Joy Goat expert visiting Maria’s buck station. There is still a bit of work to do on her female goat house but now she’s got the knowledge how to finalise it properly

Osbert

LTHT Project Manager explaining attendees about the type of fodder suitable to grow in our area which they can feed to their goats

Buck -keepers

Buck keeper training session – These guys are the role models of the cross breeding program. They will be responsible to keep our males healthy and active, identifying suitability of goats for mating and are empowered to turn down mating partners if they’re too young, too small or not healthy. 

Buck-keepers photo op

Buck keepers group photo in front of LTHT buck station + male kid collection pen.

In the next village, it was mostly women who turned up for training

Widows' training session

These are the widows who are signed up to the goat project. They will receive a a female halfbreed kid to look after until it gives birth. The grown goat becomes the widow’s personal property and the kids are then passed on to another widow in the group

buck station

We anticipate that some of the kids will be male and this is where they will be looked after

Keep an eye on this space and  our Facebook page for updates

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