Rwentojo chicken program: The chickens are here

Following the inspection of chicken coops, it was time to bring the chicks home to Rwentojo.

send a chicken

This is always an exciting time. The chicks are two months old and at this  age it is easy for anyone without prior experience of poultry farming to look after them. 

For this round of the program, we reduced the number of participants and increased the number of chicks per participant.

The village Chairman  was part of the house to house assessments  to introduce us. He did a preselection of the women who are head of households in his village – most of them are widows but there are some who apparently cannot rely on their husbands either because they’re never around or they’re alcoholics.

 

We are keen on investing in women in this part of the country as most  have no  assets that would enable them to generate income. 

Rwentojo

The next steps will involve monitoring the farms to ensure that the women are looking after the chicks properly as this has implications for how well develop into hens.

The women will receive training on how to vaccinate the chicks, book keeping and marketing. 

Watch this space for updates in the New Year. 

Update on the Rwentojo chicken program

As we count down to the distribution day our Program Managers have been busy getting the women in Rwentojo ready. There have been several training sessions, coop construction and inspection and a lots of laughter along the way. Here are some pics from those activities. 

chicken

In this session, the women learned about chicken feeding and farm management, in particular the importance of keeping the coops clean and dry

carpenter at work
Our local carpenter has been very busy. he has had to measure the coops and make up doors for each one from scratch  

chicken coop door

Following the training session, the doors to the chicken coops were distributed

chicken

Here is one of the finished chicken coops.. I bet they had fun putting this together.


Under a semi intensive poultry farming system, water is an important aspect in the care of the chickens, so drinkers are part of the equipment the women need on their farms

send a chicken

We expect that it will be 5 months before the hens start laying eggs and as such the women will not have sufficient income to feed the chicks before then. We have therefore included three months’ chickenfeed.

Send a Chicken

We need your assistance to help women in rural Uganda increase their income from 40p to £1.75 a week. That’s just 25 p a day and half the price of a daily newspaper here in the UK but £1.75 is the amount of money a woman in Uganda needs to send three children to a government school, fight malnutrition and ensure that her family can access basic health care. It’s a life changing amount. It’s a difference you can choose to make.

LTHT believes in a “hand up” rather than a “hand out” approach and you can help make that difference by donating £2.50 to our “Send a Chicken” initiative. “Send a Chicken” to an African woman is a direct way of aiding women in rural Africa to become economically independent.

Your donation of £2.50 will buy a two-month old chick for an African woman and create a life changing experience for the recipient and her family.

If you can dig deeper, for £10 we can deliver two two-month-old chicks to a village woman, help them set up a pen for the chicks, provide chicken feed for three months as well as vaccines. After that your gift will be self sustaining generating much needed income for years to come and will help build a better nourished next generation of children.

Within two months the hens will start laying eggs and we will help the women find a route to market for the surplus eggs after her family’s nutritional needs have been met.

We ask you to support this initiative because

  1. Women in rural Uganda still do all the hard work for only 40p a week and simply can’t afford this type of investment. (For most women in rural Uganda £2.50 is over an entire month’s earnings.)
  2. This initiative will enable women to acquire a new skill.
  3. By closing skills gaps amongst rural women who have no assets to generate their own income we enable them to improve their income and livelihood
  4. Better skilled African women in rural areas have a chance of generating income to benefit the community as a whole
  5. 2.3 million Ugandan children are chronically malnourished, the eggs laid will provide essential proteins for growing children

Every Little helps –Make a difference today by donating £2.50

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Please note: 100% of your donation goes directly to the recipient. There are 0% deductions

If you would prefer you can also donate through Virgin Money Giving here

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